Welcome to BoatForumz.com!
FAQFAQ    SearchSearch      ProfileProfile    Private MessagesPrivate Messages   Log inLog in

hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather

 
   Boat US (Home) -> Boat Building RSS
Next:  Expense per foot  
Author Message
AlaskaGuy

External


Since: Dec 05, 2006
Posts: 1



(Msg. 1) Posted: Tue Dec 05, 2006 9:02 pm
Post subject: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather
Archived from groups: rec>boats>building (more info?)

Hi Everyone,
I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
been told that removing it when it is below freezing ( I live in Homer
Alaska and now the highs are15-30F and lows are 5-25F) can cause
problems with the caulking and/or planking if they freeze before
drying. I do not have an area to store it either in the water for the
winter or in a garage. I will have to store it outside and with a tarp
built over it to shed snow. How can I best prepare it for this:

Should I heavily salt the inside.?
Should I try to heat the inside with a small heater for a few weeks
(how long necessary?) Should I try to tarp the waterline to the trailer
and heat the outside too?
Will this very dry air dry it too fast and be a problem?
If I don't use heat and it freezes what will happen?
Do you have any other recommendations on what I should or shouldn't
do???

I am a novice wooden boat owner. But since buying it 2 months ago have
become quite attached to it. It is a fine looking boat, seems to be
built solidly, is very tight with very little water coming into the
bilge. I have always admired the skills, knowledge, tradition, and art
that go into wooden boat construction. Now that I am responsible for
one I want to treat it right. Any help with these questions will be
much appreciated!

Thanks!!

 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Jonathan W.

External


Since: Dec 05, 2006
Posts: 1



(Msg. 2) Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 4:31 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

A wooden boat owned me for several years. 8 to be exact. It had been
uncovered for the two years prior to my taking possession of her, as
have countless other wooden boats rescued from the edge of oblivion.

Ergo it was frequently wet and frozen. I would work on getting it out
and covered. If you cover it with blue, or dark tarps, the upper range
of your temperatures will probably warm enough under the tarp to dry
soon enough any way. I don't think I would worry too much about hauling
it now, just get it covered to keep the fresh water of the winter snow
out of it.

If you are still concerned, try the forum at WoodenBoat magazine.com
with a concentrated group of wooden boat owners and builders

good luck,

Jonathan





AlaskaGuy wrote:

> Hi Everyone,
> I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
> www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
> been told that removing it when it is below freezing ( I live in Homer
> Alaska and now the highs are15-30F and lows are 5-25F) can cause
> problems with the caulking and/or planking if they freeze before
> drying. I do not have an area to store it either in the water for the
> winter or in a garage. I will have to store it outside and with a tarp
> built over it to shed snow. How can I best prepare it for this:
>
> Should I heavily salt the inside.?
> Should I try to heat the inside with a small heater for a few weeks
> (how long necessary?) Should I try to tarp the waterline to the trailer
> and heat the outside too?
> Will this very dry air dry it too fast and be a problem?
> If I don't use heat and it freezes what will happen?
> Do you have any other recommendations on what I should or shouldn't
> do???
>
> I am a novice wooden boat owner. But since buying it 2 months ago have
> become quite attached to it. It is a fine looking boat, seems to be
> built solidly, is very tight with very little water coming into the
> bilge. I have always admired the skills, knowledge, tradition, and art
> that go into wooden boat construction. Now that I am responsible for
> one I want to treat it right. Any help with these questions will be
> much appreciated!
>
> Thanks!!
>


--
I am building my daughter an Argie 10 sailing dinghy, check it out:
http://home.comcast.net/~jonsailr

 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Jim Conlin

External


Since: Feb 16, 2005
Posts: 109



(Msg. 3) Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 5:32 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Sounds like your options are limited.
Haul when you can. The most important thing is to get it covered quickly so
fresh water from rain or snow doesn't get onto/into the boat.


"AlaskaGuy" wrote in message

> Hi Everyone,
> I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
> www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
> been told that removing it when it is below freezing ( I live in Homer
> Alaska and now the highs are15-30F and lows are 5-25F) can cause
> problems with the caulking and/or planking if they freeze before
> drying. I do not have an area to store it either in the water for the
> winter or in a garage. I will have to store it outside and with a tarp
> built over it to shed snow. How can I best prepare it for this:
>
> Should I heavily salt the inside.?
> Should I try to heat the inside with a small heater for a few weeks
> (how long necessary?) Should I try to tarp the waterline to the trailer
> and heat the outside too?
> Will this very dry air dry it too fast and be a problem?
> If I don't use heat and it freezes what will happen?
> Do you have any other recommendations on what I should or shouldn't
> do???
>
> I am a novice wooden boat owner. But since buying it 2 months ago have
> become quite attached to it. It is a fine looking boat, seems to be
> built solidly, is very tight with very little water coming into the
> bilge. I have always admired the skills, knowledge, tradition, and art
> that go into wooden boat construction. Now that I am responsible for
> one I want to treat it right. Any help with these questions will be
> much appreciated!
>
> Thanks!!
>
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Matt Colie

External


Since: Dec 06, 2006
Posts: 1



(Msg. 4) Posted: Wed Dec 06, 2006 11:11 pm
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

AlaskaGuy,

I ran into this about a lifetime ago when I lived in Maine.

The damage that I saw was limited to some of the caulking being pushed
out (the yard just hammered back in with a setting iron).

I will list aswers in line (I hate this) as it seems like the best way
to keep things straight.

AlaskaGuy wrote:
> Hi Everyone,
> I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
> www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
> been told that removing it when it is below freezing ( I live in Homer
> Alaska and now the highs are15-30F and lows are 5-25F) can cause
> problems with the caulking and/or planking if they freeze before
> drying. I do not have an area to store it either in the water for the
> winter or in a garage. I will have to store it outside and with a tarp
> built over it to shed snow. How can I best prepare it for this:
>
> Should I heavily salt the inside.?
A saturated salt salution freezes at -14F - why bother

> Should I try to heat the inside with a small heater for a few weeks
> (how long necessary?)
This may do you the most good as the winter air is very low in absolute
humidity and warning it up makes it dry thing out fast.
How long? My SAG about a week maybe more if you can.

Should I try to tarp the waterline to the trailer
> and heat the outside too?
Don't bother the water that will cause you trouble is the fresh water in
the bilge.

> Will this very dry air dry it too fast and be a problem?
I could not see how. The seams and wood will only dry as fast as they
want to.

> If I don't use heat and it freezes what will happen?
You will probably have to reset some caulking.

> Do you have any other recommendations on what I should or shouldn't
> do???
If you get hung up, pour as much RV antifreeze around in the bilge as
you can. That is non-toxic propylene glycol and it will not hurt the
wood at all.
>
> I am a novice wooden boat owner. But since buying it 2 months ago have
> become quite attached to it. It is a fine looking boat, seems to be
> built solidly, is very tight with very little water coming into the
> bilge. I have always admired the skills, knowledge, tradition, and art
> that go into wooden boat construction. Now that I am responsible for
> one I want to treat it right. Any help with these questions will be
> much appreciated!
>
> Thanks!!
>
Fair Wind and Smooth Sea.
Matt Colie Lifelong Waterman, Licensed Mariner,and Pathological Sailor
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
derbyrm

External


Since: Jul 28, 2006
Posts: 17



(Msg. 5) Posted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 12:35 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Maybe not too relevant, but even without heat, the wood will dry.
Grandmother used to hang laundry outside in Chicago in the winter. First it
would freeze, then the ice would sublime. Things were still a little stiff
when brought inside, but no longer wet. It did take longer than normal.

Roger
derbyrm.DeleteThis@NOSPAMinsightbbNOSPAM.com
http://home.insightbb.com/~derbyrm

"Matt Colie" wrote in message

> AlaskaGuy,
>
> I ran into this about a lifetime ago when I lived in Maine.
>
> The damage that I saw was limited to some of the caulking being pushed out
> (the yard just hammered back in with a setting iron).
>
> I will list aswers in line (I hate this) as it seems like the best way to
> keep things straight.
>
> AlaskaGuy wrote:
>> Hi Everyone,
>> I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
>> www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
>> been told that removing it when it is below freezing ( I live in Homer
>> Alaska and now the highs are15-30F and lows are 5-25F) can cause
>> problems with the caulking and/or planking if they freeze before
>> drying. I do not have an area to store it either in the water for the
>> winter or in a garage. I will have to store it outside and with a tarp
>> built over it to shed snow. How can I best prepare it for this:
>>
>> Should I heavily salt the inside.?
> A saturated salt salution freezes at -14F - why bother
>
>> Should I try to heat the inside with a small heater for a few weeks
>> (how long necessary?)
> This may do you the most good as the winter air is very low in absolute
> humidity and warning it up makes it dry thing out fast.
> How long? My SAG about a week maybe more if you can.
>
> Should I try to tarp the waterline to the trailer
>> and heat the outside too?
> Don't bother the water that will cause you trouble is the fresh water in
> the bilge.
>
>> Will this very dry air dry it too fast and be a problem?
> I could not see how. The seams and wood will only dry as fast as they
> want to.
>
>> If I don't use heat and it freezes what will happen?
> You will probably have to reset some caulking.
>
>> Do you have any other recommendations on what I should or shouldn't
>> do???
> If you get hung up, pour as much RV antifreeze around in the bilge as you
> can. That is non-toxic propylene glycol and it will not hurt the wood at
> all.
>>
>> I am a novice wooden boat owner. But since buying it 2 months ago have
>> become quite attached to it. It is a fine looking boat, seems to be
>> built solidly, is very tight with very little water coming into the
>> bilge. I have always admired the skills, knowledge, tradition, and art
>> that go into wooden boat construction. Now that I am responsible for
>> one I want to treat it right. Any help with these questions will be
>> much appreciated!
>>
>> Thanks!!
>>
> Fair Wind and Smooth Sea.
> Matt Colie Lifelong Waterman, Licensed Mariner,and Pathological Sailor
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Garland Gray II2

External


Since: Jun 12, 2004
Posts: 42



(Msg. 6) Posted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 2:09 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

I'm just going to throw this out for comments:
Regarding antifreeze, I have read that soaking dried and cracked wood in the
regular old "green" antifreeze (glycerine ?)would actually restore the wood
to its former glory.
Is this true for the pink stuff (which of course would safer as it is non
toxic) ?

"Matt Colie" wrote in message

snip
> If you get hung up, pour as much RV antifreeze around in the bilge as you
> can. That is non-toxic propylene glycol and it will not hurt the wood at
> all.
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
RW Salnick

External


Since: Jan 19, 2006
Posts: 21



(Msg. 7) Posted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 1:05 pm
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Garland Gray II inscribed in red ink for all to know:
> I'm just going to throw this out for comments:
> Regarding antifreeze, I have read that soaking dried and cracked wood in the
> regular old "green" antifreeze (glycerine ?)would actually restore the wood
> to its former glory.
> Is this true for the pink stuff (which of course would safer as it is non
> toxic) ?
>
> "Matt Colie" wrote in message
>
> snip
>
>>If you get hung up, pour as much RV antifreeze around in the bilge as you
>>can. That is non-toxic propylene glycol and it will not hurt the wood at
>>all.
>
>
>


I think you are attempting to distinguish between ethylene glycol
(toxic) and propylene glycol (less toxic) by the color of the dye added
by the manufacturer. Don't do this... There is no dye standard
enforced by anyone. Instead, read the label and look for either
ethylene glycol or propylene glocol.

bob
s/v Eolian
Seattle
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Bob

External


Since: Jul 12, 2006
Posts: 54



(Msg. 8) Posted: Thu Dec 07, 2006 3:25 pm
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

AlaskaGuy wrote:
> Hi Everyone,
> I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
> www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
> been told that removing it when it is below freezing


Could do what the oldtimmers did.
Fill it with rocks and sink it.
Come spring dry it out and sail a tight boat that wont leak.
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
imagineero

External


Since: Oct 15, 2005
Posts: 9



(Msg. 9) Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 1:45 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Bob wrote:
> AlaskaGuy wrote:
> > Hi Everyone,
> > I was not able to get my boat (1934 Skipjack -
> > www.homerhostel.com/boat.htm) out of the water yet this autumn. I have
> > been told that removing it when it is below freezing
>
>
> Could do what the oldtimmers did.
> Fill it with rocks and sink it.
> Come spring dry it out and sail a tight boat that wont leak.

freshwater will be your worst enemy, causing rot. Most of the
commercial products need dry wood to start with, and they puts them out
in my book. Salt in the bilge has some effect, but ethylene glycol
seems to be the best thing for it. Views vary on how bad this stuff
is, but it seems to be acceptable to me. Just dont spray it on in a
fine mist or you'll end up breathing it in. It goes right through
paint, will penetrate wood, doesnt stop its action when mixed with
water. poor some in your bilge, any rot you have, and anywhere that
freshwater is likely to drip.

There are some good writeups on using it if you look around

Shaun
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Bob

External


Since: Jul 12, 2006
Posts: 54



(Msg. 10) Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 4:11 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

imagineero wrote:
> Bob wrote:
> > Could do what the oldtimmers did.
> > Fill it with rocks and sink it.
> > Come spring dry it out and sail a tight boat that wont leak.
>


> freshwater will be your worst enemy, causing rot.

So why did I know a guy in the Great Lakes who was under water logging
100+ year old submerged logs? Also, same thing happening in the
Columbia River. Logs that got waterlogged (interesting word) 100 years
ago and sunk out of the log rafts. Fine years later. no rot?

Now why would a log not rot in fresh water????

I like the idea of packing it with salt. One of the reasons the Scow
Schooner ALma in SF Bay survived was that it hauled salt for years. Or
so the PR says.
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Matt Colie

External


Since: Dec 09, 2006
Posts: 1



(Msg. 11) Posted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 1:57 pm
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

Bob,
I do not know about the Columbia River, but I can tell you about the
Great Lakes (I live out here now).

All of the lakes are cold (in the case of Superior - Damn Cold), some of
the lakes have very low oxygen at the deeper levels because there is
very little vertical circulation. Some of the best logs recovered are
the oaks and such that do not rot easily in any case.

This is why the lakes have been a wreck divers paradise, but you have to
be ready for the cold. Until the Russians buying Canadian grain brought
us zebra mussels, many wrecks either wood or iron looked like they could
be pumped out returned to service.

Matt Colie


Bob wrote:
> imagineero wrote:
>
>>Bob wrote:
>>
>>>Could do what the oldtimmers did.
>>>Fill it with rocks and sink it.
>>>Come spring dry it out and sail a tight boat that wont leak.
>>
>
>
>>freshwater will be your worst enemy, causing rot.
>
>
> So why did I know a guy in the Great Lakes who was under water logging
> 100+ year old submerged logs? Also, same thing happening in the
> Columbia River. Logs that got waterlogged (interesting word) 100 years
> ago and sunk out of the log rafts. Fine years later. no rot?
>
> Now why would a log not rot in fresh water????
>
> I like the idea of packing it with salt. One of the reasons the Scow
> Schooner ALma in SF Bay survived was that it hauled salt for years. Or
> so the PR says.
>
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
imagineero

External


Since: Oct 15, 2005
Posts: 9



(Msg. 12) Posted: Mon Dec 11, 2006 4:13 am
Post subject: Re: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather [Login to view extended thread Info.]
Archived from groups: per prev. post (more info?)

> >>freshwater will be your worst enemy, causing rot.
> >
> >
> > So why did I know a guy in the Great Lakes who was under water logging
> > 100+ year old submerged logs? Also, same thing happening in the
> > Columbia River. Logs that got waterlogged (interesting word) 100 years
> > ago and sunk out of the log rafts. Fine years later. no rot?
> >
> > Now why would a log not rot in fresh water????

Im not an expert on rot, but what i understand from what I've read is
that the ideal conditions for rot are fresh water + oxygen + heat. I
may be wrong on this, but i thought that rot was made up of a hierarchy
of bacteria, and it builds up as a food chain to the point where youve
got really bad rot. If you can kill one part of the cycle you get rid
of your problems. I know for sure that a boat left sitting in a
backyard for a long time exposed to rain water is a prime candidate for
rot, whereas a hull left in the ocean is likely to last a lot longer
(at least below the water line).

Rot seems to always start where freshwater leaks/drips in. With the
case of the logs deep down in the lake my guess would be lack of exygen
plus lack of heat prevents things from going too badly wrong....

Just my opinions, youd do well to take them with a pinch of salt Wink
 >> Stay informed about: hauling wooden boat in below freezing weather 
Back to top
Login to vote
Display posts from previous:   
Related Topics:
Wooden Boat Builder - F.Y.I. This is not a sales pitch it's an F.Y.I. New Wooden Boat Community Discussion Group on MSN Groups. http://groups.msn.com/woodenboatbuilder Active, maintaned and moderated. All about Wooden boats, building, techniques, supplies, and resources.....

Wooden Boat Magazine - I own 32 issues of Wooden Boat magazine that I no longer want to keep; see listing below for volume number, month(s) and year. Most are in good shape, meaning no torn covers, missing pages or stains. There are a few whose covers are only partly stapled t...

Wooden boat repair advice - I have a 56 Penn Yan Captivator that I worked on for several years. The entire hull below the spray-rail was West-system epoxied, because there was substantial rot in the ribs and floor that we didn't want to deal with (the boat was given to me, it was m...

hesitant buyer of wooden boat - Hello, I have recently found an old (1960's?) Penn Yan boat, I think about 21 ft. Under the false floor I can see that the ribs are rotting as there is 1/2" of standing water in the boat. It looks to me like the work to restore this and actuall...

Double canoe wooden pontoon boat??? - Please forgive the long post, but I need some boat building help. I have dreamt up this crazy idea about building a powered Double canoe wooden pontoon boat(similar to a Hawaiian double canoe). The basic idea is this... Build two 16' light weight..
   Boat US (Home) -> Boat Building All times are: Pacific Time (US & Canada)
Page 1 of 1

 
You can post new topics in this forum
You can reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum



[ Contact us | Terms of Service/Privacy Policy ]